A few nutcases, ehrm, I mean highly intelligent individuals, have reacted to my recent Ironman experience by mentioning they would quite like to try it themselves. If you are one of them I apologise if I have appeared less than totally enthusiastic. I can understand it probably seems confusing considering my excessive enthusiasm for my own Ironman experience.

But the thing is this: I don’t actually recommend throwing yourself into an Ironman project – not at least without an awful lot of reflection and thought. My reservations aren’t about your physical capacity. Let’s face it, if I – a middle aged, female, cancer survivor with absolutely zero talent for swimming – can do it, then unless you have some kind of physical illness or disability that prevents it, so can you. The issue is rather that an Ironman project isn’t just a physical challenge. Not even mainly a physical challenge. The biggest challenges, as I’ve hinted before, are mental and social.

So here is my list of things that you need to think about if you are considering your own Ironman project.

The home-front: If you are single and live alone you can skip this one. But if you are in a relationship, and particularly if you have children, this is the single biggest thing you need to consider if you ask me. This Ironman stuff is just for fun, so it’s not worth putting your family life on the line for! For the reasons I list below you cannot do it without it affecting the whole family, so unless your family also actively buy into the project, as opposed to grudgingly putting up with it, I wouldn’t recommend it! A good starting point might be to get your spouse to read this and see what they say…..

Time: Unless you regularly sit around for 10-20 hours each week wondering what to do with yourself, then you need to figure out where the time is going to come from. Over the 10 months I was specifically training towards the Ironman I averaged 11-12 hours training a week, but some weeks were up to 20 hours. And this doesn’t count time spent on things like bike maintenance or commuting to training. For example, for me a 1 hour open-water swim session could easily take 3-4 hours, if you include transport, changing and rinsing my wetsuit after. I was doing that 2-3 times a week. All this time needs to come from somewhere – family time, work time or time with friends – it’s not going to come from sleeping less, because you’re going to need more, rather than less of that too!

Money: Triathlon is a really expensive sport! The amount you could spend is probably limitless. I haven’t kept track of how much I have spent, but I’m fairly sure I would be shocked even though I know it’s a lot. And I have definitely done it in a low key way. There is the obvious expenditure – a bike, bike shoes, a wetsuit, running shoes etc. There are also entry fees for the big one, but also for other smaller events in the run-up, energy products (cost a lot more than you would imagine) and coaching. Not to mention endless pieces of equipment and kit you suddenly realise you can’t live without. Apart from anything else you need to figure out if you can afford it. Unless you have a limitless budget you are going to need to try to figure out how much you are willing to spend and how you prioritise. For example, I prioritised spending money on good coaching (and a professional bike fit) as opposed to buying a fancy triathlon bike, which I really believe was a good decision, but a lot of people choose the opposite……

Project Length: You also need to be realistic about how long it is likely to take you to get in shape to do an Ironman. It took me 3 years from the time I first time I had the thought until I did it. Granted I was a chemo patient when I first got the idea so it’s not necessarily going to take everyone that long! But unless you are already an accomplished marathon runner, long distance cyclist AND swimmer or have multiple half-ironman successes under your belt, it probably isn’t realistic to think you’ll do it within 3 months. My recommendation is to take a realistic look at where you are now and what you would need to do to get to the stage where you are able to take a decision about whether or not to do it. In my case I needed to learn to swim, so I set myself a goal to swim 1000 m crawl without breaks and only when I could do that I would I take the decision to go for it for real. The process is going to be different for everyone, so if you have never run more than 5km you might want to try training for a half marathon first, or if you have never tried cycling for more than transport, to buy a racer bike and participate in a bike race.

Motivation: Apart from support from the home-front, this is probably the most important one. If you burn enough to do an Ironman, then you will find a solution to the other challenges. So you need to figure out how much you really want to do it – enough to take a break from work for 6 months if that’s what it takes? Enough to cancel the family holiday so you can afford it? That’s the “big picture” motivation. What about the day to day motivation? If you’re the type that normally struggles to keep on training 3 times a week during the winter is it realistic that you are going to consistently get out there for 6-10 sessions a week? And enjoy it? Because let’s face it, if you don’t enjoy it you’re not going to do it. If you haven’t tried training up to a “big” event like a marathon (or whatever the equivalent would be in cycling or swimming) before, I would try that first and see if you actually like it. And even though I didn’t actually manage to finish the half-ironman I had scheduled to do before the Ironman, I would recommend doing a half before you go for the whole…..

If you have seriously thought about all this: you have a realistic idea of the process you need to put in place towards an ironman and how long that is going to take; have figured out how you’re going to make the time to prioritise this for however long you need; you know where the money is going to come from and your family are already enthusiastically designing the banners to cheer you on….

If you are so desperate to do an Ironman that you simply can’t not do it…..

Then go for it! Enjoy it! If my experience is anything to go by it will probably be one of the best experiences of your life…..

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50s: Here I come!

September 13, 2013

Today is the last day of my 40s! Somehow I can’t help but take stock of the last 10 years: to compare where I am now with where I was in 2003 and the journey between.

Ten years ago I had a bit of a crisis as I was approaching 40. A year or so before that birthday I saw a photo of myself and got a shock. I looked fat and frumpy and middle-aged and my outside didn’t match how I felt inside (and no, I’m not going to show you the photo!). I wasn’t dissatisfied with my life. I had two lovely, but sometimes challenging children, and a job I loved. But I was often stressed. I often felt guilty – because I felt I wasn’t doing a good enough job at home or because I wasn’t doing a good enough job at work. I felt depressed about turning 40. It sounded OLD! My picture of how the world was for women in their 40’s didn’t seem very appealing. So in desperation, as I approached 40, I overhauled my eating habits losing close to 20 kg over a year and I started to exercise, running a few times a week (though never more than 5km).

I’m probably not the best judge, but I think I probably look younger now approaching 50 than I did when I approached 40 (those of you who have known me that long may well disagree)! For sure I have more grey hair and my skin is gradually succumbing to gravity. But I weigh 5 kg less now than I did AFTER the pre-40 diet, and I’m much more toned – not to mention fit! When, I see pictures of myself, I look pretty much how I feel inside. My life is also totally different now. My children are still lovely and still challenging, but as teenagers they demand much less of my time. I still love my work but I’m rarely stressed and rarely feel guilty. I now have a lifestyle where, being self-employed, I have control over how I use my time and what I prioritise. Sometimes it’s work, sometimes it’s training for an Ironman, sometimes it’s family time, sometimes it’s hanging out with friends or reading a good book. I decide!

For sure the journey here has been very different than I would predicted 10 years ago, with ups and downs as there always are in life. On the up side I have run 3 marathons and done an Ironman; I dared to take the risk and become self-employed; I learned to swim; I’ve made new friends; I could go on! On the down side I have lost some people I was close to, including my Dad; I went through a rough time at work at one point; and of course the big one, the one that still, in my consciousness, overshadows everything else over the last 10 years, I got cancer.
However I know that my life wouldn’t be the way it is today without every single step of the journey: the good things and the bad.

So today I don’t feel depressed about turning 50! Apart from anything else, I’m just really happy still to be around! On top of that I’m kind of excited about what the next years, how every many they are, are going to bring – the good and the bad. Mainly because I don’t care what the world expects of women in their 50s: I know I can do whatever I want to do if I put my mind to it and that is just what I’m planning to do!

Thank you……

September 8, 2013

I don’t know about you, but I was totally inspired by Diana Nyad’s amazing swim from Cuba to the USA. I would like to be like Diana Nyad when I grow up! Mind you I’m not sure that swimming from Cuba to the USA is the goal for me – or swimming from anywhere to anywhere for that matter! It’s the attitude and the mindset that I’m talking about.

“I’ve got three messages” she said “One is we should never, ever give up. Two is you never are too old to chase your dreams. Three is it looks like a solitary sport, but it’s a team.”

Her third point could just as easily relate to doing an Ironman. Everyone crossing the finishing line of an Ironman gets celebrated – “You are an Ironman”! Fair enough. But by rights everyone crossing that line ought to have the opportunity to stand up on a stage and give an Oscars type thank you speech, because I simply do not believe that anyone who gets there does so without a supporting team.

So I want to dedicate this blog post to thanking my supporting team. I would not have made it to the start line, let alone the finish line without the support of this bunch…..

My husband Erik. Every year when the Ironman is held in Copenhagen there are articles in the media featuring

Erik cheering on his crazy wife

Erik cheering on his crazy wife

grumpy spouses complaining about their triathlon-obsessed partners. This was, however, not my experience. Erik was a core member of my Ironman project team from day 1 until I reached my goal. He has picked up the slack at home while I have been out training for hours on end, he has followed my training with genuine interest, he has never complained about the amounts of time or money I have been spending, he has spent hours sitting on beaches watching me swim, and on the big day itself he was there cheering me on throughout the day from the swim start, during the bike and the run all the way to the finish. Not only has he not been grumpy about it, but he has never left me in doubt that he is immensely proud of his crazy wife!

My dear friend and coach, Bjarke. Bjarke has the honour of being the only person in the world who can tell me to do something and I will do it without question!  If he told me to run around Denmark for my Sunday run I might raise an eyebrow but I would do my best! We’ve known each other for years and his passion for running has been a huge influence in igniting my own passion. He trained me up for my first marathon and every other sporting goal I’ve tackled since. He cheered me on when I was ill and helped me every step of the way back to fitness.  When I told him that I wanted to do an Ironman he not only didn’t laugh, but was full of encouragement and excitement and has embraced the project with overwhelming amounts of enthusiasm, energy and not least, expert knowledge. This has been a 100% joint Bjarke/Kirsten project from start to finish and although I had to physically carry out the last part, the actual Ironman, by myself, Bjarke was with me in spirit the entire day. Bjarke has written his own blog post about our Ironman project (in Danish) which you can read here. Every time I read it it makes me cry!

Friends at first sight!

Friends at first sight!

My dear friend, Isti. I met Isti almost exactly one year ago and it was “friendship at first sight”! We quickly discovered that, by some weird coincidence, not only were we both cancer survivors, but we were both thinking of doing an Ironman this year. So Isti and I became an integral part of each other’s Ironman projects – and lives. I cannot imagine having done this without him. And I cannot imagine how my family and other friends would have put up with me if I hadn’t had Isti to nerd and obsess with endlessly about the ups and downs of our training. Being different genders and different ages means it is a match made in heaven as it eliminates any potential – friendship destroying – competition (i.e. Isti is much stronger and faster than me)!  I am totally and immensely proud of what he has achieved – completing his Ironman in an incredible 10:35:05!

Torbjørn. I suspect I’m probably the least talented swimmer Torbjørn has ever had the misfortune to teach. In the 1½ years I’ve been in his classes, I have consistently been the worst swimmer – even when new beginners joined they have always already been better than me after a week (honestly, I’m not exaggerating!).  In theory it’s not a lot of fun always being bottom of the class, particularly when you have as fragile self-confidence in water as I have. Yet, I cannot tell you how Torbjørn does it, but he has never made me feel like it was embarrassing or problematic that I was the worst – on the contrary more that I deserve respect for fighting my demons. And in the meantime he has helped me to improve, at my own tortoise pace, AND deal with my fear (which you can also read about here), so that I not only was able to swim 3.8 km (albeit in the second slowest time of all!) but I ENJOYED it! You can’t all be lucky enough to have Torbjørn as your trainer, but you can buy his book “Tri”!(in Danish, but I think it will be coming in English soon.)

Morten. The transition from the pool to open water really challenged my fragile swimming confidence and Morten is the one who has, metaphorically at least, held my hand from my very first open water swim until a final briefing at the Ironman swim route a couple of days before the big one. Isti and I have had personal lessons with him a couple of times a week throughout the summer and I doubt that I would ever have been ready without Morten’s help.  When you are as scared as I sometimes have been in the water you feel incredibly vulnerable, yet I have always felt totally safe with Morten. At the same time he has challenged me to go outside my comfort zone and to experiment with my swimming style, which in turn has gradually increased my confidence. On top of that he is also a lot of fun and I have also learned that it isn’t easy to swim when you are having a fit of the giggles! If you live in the Copenhagen area and are looking for a triathlon trainer I cannot recommend Morten highly enough. He also has a triathlon shop where not only does he have very cool gear, but freely shares his extensive triathlon knowledge and experience.

Without these five, I would probably have given up along the way and not have had the opportunity to fulfil my dream. I am so incredibly touched by all of them, the way they have believed in me and my project, and enthusiastically and passionately shared their time, their knowledge and experience so that I could have one of the best experiences of my life. Gentlemen, I thank you all from the bottom of my heart.