New York marathon 2013 more than lived up to my expectations!

Running a marathon is always emotional (at least it is for me), but there’s something particular about New York that pushes all the emotional buttons. It starts with Frank Sinatra’s New York, New York blasting out from the speakers as we stand in excited anticipation waiting for the starting gun. Then there’s the first kilometer climbing to the course’s highest point on the Verazzano-Narrows Bridge with a view to Manhattan in the distance and NYPD helicopters hovering at our side, like a scene from a movie. Then the streets lined with screaming spectators and bands and DJs playing all along the route. I’ll spare you the details of the most disgusting toilet I’ve ever had the misfortune to use in my whole life which provoked an entirely different kind of emotion! Soon forgotten thanks to the sight of runners competing despite various physical disabilities and or those fighting to keep going while suffering what looks like their life’s biggest battle. Then there’s the silence as we cross the Queensboro Bridge until we near the Manhattan end when a low noise starts, gradually getting louder and louder until it erupts into deafening cheering. The wonderful sight of my two absolute biggest supporters, husband Erik, and coach Bjarke, standing together on First Avenue. Then the final couple of kilometres through Central Park, the amazing sight of the finishing line, not to mention the incredible relief at being able to stop running once it’s crossed. I had a lump in my throat for the first 5 km and the last 2 km and the tears were close most of the time in between.

Running a marathon is also always hard (at least it is for me), and there’s also something particular abut New York that makes it really hard: the hills! I had forgotten how hilly it actually is. Or perhaps I was just so locked inside my own misery last time that I didn’t notice them. I noticed them this time!

 

NY Marathon altitude profile

NY Marathon altitude profile

 

I started out at my planned pace, but after a while realised that I wasn’t going to be able to sustain it so turned it down a notch and pretty much held the new tempo the rest of the way, though it was hard at the end! I was thankful that my goal was to have a good experience rather than a particular time. The latter would have made me press on for much longer, it would have been miserable and I probably wouldn’t have crossed the finish line sooner. As it was, it was hard, but in a good way. I didn’t hit the wall or have a crisis and when I finished I felt that I had given it my best. My finish time was 3:52:59.544129_10201242056347222_1647278478_n

In the aftermath I’m left with a feeling that at very long last, in terms of running and physical fitness, I’m at least back to where I would have been had I not had cancer. Of course I don’t know how I would have developed as a runner if it hadn’t happened, but I don’t think I would be running much faster at any distance, including marathon, than I have done this season. I never expected that it would take me three years, and along the way I have doubted that it was going to happen. So it’s a big deal!

Somehow it is very fitting that it was running New York marathon that got me to that point since New York was that last marathon I ran just a few months before I got my cancer diagnosis. From now on I am no longer a runner trying to get back in shape after cancer. I’m just a runner.

Advertisements