One of the things that originally attracted me to running was its flexibility. At that time I was a working Mum with small children and a demanding job which required me to travel frequently. I wanted to get, then later to stay, fit but couldn’t commit to having to turn up regularly at specific training times. With a bit of coordination on the home front though I could fit in runs and I always packed my running shoes when I was travelling.

I’m clearly not the only one who does that. Several times I have read articles that celebrate how wonderful running is for exploring foreign destinations. Clearly those people don’t travel to the same places I do! OK yes, I have travelled to places like New York, Washington DC or Paris with work and explored in my running shoes. Usually, though, my travels take me to places in the developing world where the crazy traffic or personal safety and security issues make running outside inadvisable.
So when I book hotels my first priority is whether they have a fitness centre!

As a result, over the years I have become something of an authority on hotel fitness centres and I kind of regret that I didn’t, from the start, record my experiences and write small reviews of them. From my, albeit, limited experience of fitness centres in Europe or north America, including those in hotels, they have a certain sameness, but hotels in the places I visit are often, what should we call it…..quirky? And their fitness centres are certainly that too!

The ones I like best are those that also have members from the local area, mainly because they are busier which provides entertainment as I pound out my kilometres on the treadmill. In some places people mainly walk, not run, on the treadmills. I guess this is because the middle/upper drive not walk around outside so they have to go to the gym for a walk. In those places I get a lot of attention when I crank up the speed – at home as a middle aged woman I’m never going to be a running star so I soak it up when I can! One guy jogged backwards on the treadmill each day – and told me that it was dangerous that I ran so fast! Danger is clearly different things to different people. Another time a girl was jogging next to me while chatting on her phone, missed her footing and crashed backwards of the treadmill landing on the floor – and never stopped talking the whole time! Oh, and I have many times seen people jogging/walking on treadmills with flipflops on their feet!

At the other end of the spectrum, I was once staying in a fancy, newly opened hotel in Kampala, Uganda which had a huge state of the art fitness centre only for hotel residents. I went every day during my visit and in that time never saw another soul using it. There was a very bored instructor there, who clearly had been told he wasn’t allowed to use the equipment himself. We chatted a lot and he told me he was a runner too and offered to take me one evening to the local airfield where they trained. I didn’t go because I had a work commitment, but I regret it to this day…….

However funny or interesting these experiences are though, they do not detract from the fact that I truly hate running on a treadmill. I know people who run on a treadmill through choice and I just do not get it. During a 30-60 minute treadmill run I go through more mental anguish and turmoil than during a whole marathon (or Ironman for that matter). I have to employ every mental and motivational trick I know to get me through it! But hey, at least it also trains my mental toughness!

So why do I do it? Well, the only thing I can think of that is worse than the treadmill torture is not running at all! I recall one two-week trip I had to Luanda, Angola where I was staying in a small guest house with no fitness centre and where I was advised that it wasn’t safe for me to run outside. It was terrible! I was desperate! (OK, the fact that my suitcase didn’t turn up for 10 days did also contribute to my general state of misery!).

I am writing this from Monrovia, Liberia. I was here for a couple of weeks in January and I’m here again now for a couple of weeks. My hotel doesn’t have a fitness centre but residents can use the one in an apartment block 100 meters along the road. Although the building is right on the edge of the ocean, the fitness room is in a damp, dark, basement room with no window. Oh, and the electricity supply is very unstable so the power keeps going off and I frequently find myself plunged into darkness and the treadmill suddenly stops. And there aren’t many users to distract me (I wonder why?!?) so I churn out my kilometres and train my mental toughness and dream of spring in Denmark and running in the forest.

As a runner it’s a privilege to live in Denmark. We have a moderate climate which means we can run outdoors all year round – it’s never too warm in the summer or too cold in the winter. It rains for sure, but rarely the torrential kind that would prevent running and rarely for a whole day so with a bit of flexibility you can avoid it. Sometimes it snows, but rarely very deeply and the public services are effective at clearly roads and bike paths to run on. It’s perfectly safe to run around outside – even in the dark, without risks of being attacked and the traffic is regulated and safe and as long as you take precautions to ensure you’re visible, there is no real risk there. And most of us live within easy reach of parks or forests or other pleasant natural areas to run.

I just hope I remember this the next time I’m faced with having to go out for a run on a dark, windy, rainy evening!

After New York marathon at the beginning of November, I entered a period where I had no new goal and no desire to have one. That might not seem like a big deal, but I can’t emphasise enough how unusual that is for me. Typically I have my next goals lined up before the current ones are completed and I’d had New York marathon on the calendar long before the Ironman in August.

This time though, I needed some time and space to reflect over – and digest – what I’d been through, before figuring out what I wanted to do next. Here are some of the results of my reflections:

  • Despite having done an Ironman I don’t identify myself as a triathlete. I’m a runner.
  •  Nonetheless, my body functions well when I train like a triathlete and it has a good effect on my running.
  • I enjoy swimming, especially in open water, even though I’m not very fast and I still have an underlying fear of water.
  • I loved the whole process of training for the Ironman, particularly having to learn many new things and constantly push my limits, but also the aspect of having to manage a big project with many different elements.

Perhaps the biggest lesson though was this. Immediately after the Ironman I was really surprised – shocked even -that it hadn’t seemed hard and that I got through the 13+ hours without a crisis or hitting the wall. I’ve since come to the conclusion that our bodies are designed to be in motion over long periods of time. It requires the right training and the hitting right strategy on the day, but if you can find the right intensity, you can pretty much just keep going.

Racing on the local trails

Racing on the local trails

During this period I also had no training programme, which is even more unusual for me than having no goal. For once I was happy to let my feet decide where they wanted to run, and how far and fast. I’m incredibly lucky to live in a town which is surrounded by lakes and forests and when my feet decide, more often than not I find myself on the forest trails. This is the place where I do my reflection and find my inspiration.

On one of those runs, out of the blue, I suddenly knew that my next goal was to participate in an ultra-race (defined as anything more than a marathon). At least it felt like it was out of the blue: in retrospect it is apparent that it was the culmination of my reflections.

Initially I was thinking in terms of a 6 hour race, where you run as far as you can in 6 hours – typically round and round a relatively short, flat route. That was until I found about plans to organise an ultra-trail event in the forest near my home and I knew that was what I wanted to do.

So my next goal is Trailman 50 (very hilly) miles (80.4 km) on 19 October 2014.

A new adventure, a new challenge, a new project!